Posted by: shorelineclusterpoets | October 29, 2010

A great poem and great writing advice from Charles Rafferty

I found this on Wednesday. A great poem by a terrific Connecticut writer, Charles Rafferty, and an interview with him that gives some interesting incite into his writing process.

Click here and give me some comments on what you think.

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Responses

  1. Hey Rudy,
    Thanks so much for this and for all the entries I have not gotten around to comment upon. Very enjoyable to read the SCP!

    Very good poem on the carpe diem theme –
    It is often quite interesting to hear a poet describe the process by which she/he creates.
    His formula seems to involve the right amount of coffee & train commute & sitting on it 6 months for revisions … that would seem the upper limit to me.
    How long a person should delay exposing a poem to the world to allow for revisions seems to vary widely from poets I’ve talked with.
    My personal feeling is that a poem revised too far after the fact becomes a different poem from the prime intent, because we are constantly evolving (hopefully) and therefore our perceptions are evolving. I think preserving the prime intent intact should be as important as whatever improvement the revision offers. Otherwise the poem is not about its subject but rather about its subject through a filter of time and perspective – which can also be fine, but I DONT think EVERY poem SHOULD be a memoir poem! IMHO – A well honed poem usually requires some thoughtful revision, but I have seen too many revisions over too long a time render some savory poems stale.

    A very talented CT poet, Robin Sampson, has a blogspot called
    poetrylinernotes.blogspot.com
    which features regional poets talking about the inspirations for their work.
    (I talk about my poem “Key” about 3/4 through posted pieces (July, 2009)

    • I completely agree about letting too long pass between revisions. Frame of mind certainly plays a big part of the initial creation of a poem. If too much time goes by, the writer is usually in a different state, which makes it hard to recapture that initial thought.

    • That’s a neat site you posted. Shame it doesn’t seem to have anything added since May.


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